Recent Updates.. [.....More]

Friday

A Few of Grandma's Cooking Tools/Gadgets..

OK.. These are actually mine.. But what I meant to say is that these are the age-old traditional tools that are used to make some traditional Andhra foods... These tools are originated from the Telangana region (Northern) of Andhra Pradesh, India.

I'll start with the most famous one -

"Murukula Paavu" (Muruku Press)

Is very much like a cookie press in modern days. It has a bunch of plates that you can fit into the press, and make murukus of different shapes. The handle on the top and the plate on the bottom can be removed. The older models were made of brass with 2 handles and needed both hands to operate. I dont have one of those, so no pic to post.. but I'll try to find something online.. I have used this to make my Sorghum Murukulu. If you dont have a muruku press, you can try getting a cookie press like this one. Which might work. Some muruku varieties can be made by hand too. But most varieties do call for the use of this tool.


"Boondhi Jalli Ganta" (Boondhi Strainer)

This one is infact passed on from my mom to me. You can tell its pretty old.. Atleast 30-35 years probably.. Made of iron. So, when you wash it, it rusts up. You are supposed to just wipe it clean apply oil and keep aside no washing.. But, we realized it pretty late I guess :) Its basically a larger strainer with edges to hold the besan batter when making boondhi. I use this to make boondhi laddu. If you dont have this tool, you could use a regular strainer with round holes and it may be a bit difficult if it doesnt have the sides to keep the batter contained. But I have tried it once before when I didnt have this.


"Gavvala Peeta" (Shell making tool)

This is a pretty simple wood tool with tiny grooves. When dough is pressed over it and rolled, it creates a shell like design.. and hence the name "Gavvalu" which in Telugu means "Shells". I use this to make Gavvalu. This is so much fun to make. Pressing on that tool..and coming out with cute dough shells ! If you dont have this tool, you can use a Hair Comb (Unused new one obviously.. ;)) with narrow teeth. It will work pretty well. I have used this before too.


"Kariyala/Kajjikayaa peeta"

As the name says, this is a small tool used to make Kariyalu/Kajjikayalu. I have a smaller sized tool, and the last time I made the Kariyalu/Kajjikayalu.. I made them with hand since I wanted to make pretty big ones. Its not too hard to make with hand...though it takes some practice. I think its a lot of fun :) So, if you dont have this, you can still make kariyalu :)

This goes to the Kitchen Treasure Hunt Event hosted @ Chitra Amma's Kitchen.

9 comments:

Happy cook said...

Theyy all looks so nice, i just have the first one :-)

Priya said...

Looks fantastic pallavi...

srikars kitchen said...

Old is GOLD...

sra said...

I'm struck by such a big wave of nostalgia! Of all these, the gavvala peeta is the least familiar to me but I have seen it, I remember vaguely. People use forks too, to shape the gavvalu.

Kitchen Flavours said...

Suprise Weekend Bonanza waiting for you.

Dibs said...

Wow Pallavi - You hardly get to see these kind of things these days. Thanks for sharing!

Divya Vikram said...

Great collection..i have the fist murukku press too..

Shillu said...

Definitely a trip down memory lane... my grand mom & mom have these... I dont :(

Ramya said...

Pallavi... thanks for sharing those infos... I'm enlightened!

Related Titles

You can get this widget from here